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Tuesday, 12 August 2014

Can you make your dream reality?

An interesting discussion has popped up on my Facebook feed - I follow Ray Villafane, the talented pumpkin carver and sculptor, who does the massive pumpkins in Central Park each year, and just recently did sand sculptures in Europe. An incredibly talented artist.

Image with permission from Villafane Studios from their website http://www.villafanestudios.com/gallery/

He was discussing those that give up their dreams for more stable jobs. Ultimately, there are people that do this, as the security and demands of daily life lead them to make this decision. He sees it as fear.

There are those that don't, who follow their dreams, and for some, make it happen. For others, a hard slog on a road that doesn't take them where they want to go.

I don't sit in judgment of those that gave up. I was one of them. I've a had a life where I worked for 11 months a year to travel for one, and had a great time on weekends and in the evening. I was happy enough with that.

I am currently trying to follow a dream, but this is only made possible by someone else working the hard work, while I try to find a balance that means I get the work I want and no one else in the family's lifestyle needs to suffer. I've yet to see if I can do this.

Villafane says "Optimism can be such a valuable trait. It allows you to imagine and thus see the possibilities." While not my natural inclination, I am currently working on this, thinking 'why not me?' when applying for jobs or submitting stories and articles, instead of not bothering because I know it won't be what they want. His thoughts on the subject were exactly what I needed to hear at this time.

The quote I want to leave you with is Villafane's final remark "In the end I guess the world has lots of positions for frightened workers that help the dreamers to achieve their goals." (full post & interesting discussion on his facebook page)

I'd be interested to know what you think of this, and where you stand on the subject. Is this what you need to hear right now?

17 comments:

  1. I guess it's true in a sense- the other way to look at it is that many of us can't afford to follow our dreams. I know for me to retrain in the career I'd love, it would mean 4 years full time uni (and the associated debt) and then 8 years of work to start making slightly less money than my current full time wage. My family cannot afford that. My husband has the potential to earn more in what he does- but not that much more.

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  2. I like that end quote and this post really resonates with me because I will be in the sane position when I go back to work. Keep chirping away at your dream. Better to be passionate than bored.

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  3. That final quote really does slam the message home. Unfortunately unless I win the Lotto I'll have to be a 'frightened worker'. Good luck with your goals Lydia.

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  4. That last comment is quite confronting Lydia, it makes me think.
    At the moment, I'm lucky enough to be chasing my dream, while my husband slogs away at a stable job that provides for us. But, I do have complete faith that in the future, he'll be able to follow his dream. For us, it's all about timing.

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  5. Very appropriate topic to me at the moment Lydia! From the age of 17 to 48 I gave up any dreams to work in a career that lacked any creativity and did not make me happy. I did it for security, a steady income and the fear of losing that. I had three children to get through school and a mortgage to pay! Two years ago, I left that career and have since been earning no income while I work out what it is I want to do. I started my blog and have since been studying photography and plan to start a photography business soon as well as continuing with a revamped blog etc. There is guilt because hubbys income is the only income at the moment but my health was suffering so I think that guilt is unfounded. I also got a pay out when I left my job which was very helpful. The time is right for me now. This time I am not giving up on the dream. That quote of Villafane's is interesting. I'm going to have to pop over and have a peep at the discussion around it!

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  6. I think in our modern western world we place a lot of value on money. Most of the decisions we make are made from a financial perspective, can we afford another child, can we afford the mortgage repayments in this area, can we afford a take away coffee. I think we should focus more on what we want: do I want a child, do I want to live there, do I want a coffee. From there the focus should be how to get there. This is something I am attempting to do in my life. This is the reason I have five children. It is hard. People judge you for poor financial decisions. But, whatever. I and my husband are doing what we want to end up with a life that we are proud off. It may take us the long way finically, but we don't care.

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  7. Very interesting. While I know I don't want to go back to the corporate world, it's really hard for me to describe what my dreams are. I truly admire those who have a definite idea. Maybe I'm still too scared to dream? Hmmm…food for thought.

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  8. P.S Off to follow Ray on FB now :)

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  9. Interesting thoughts and words... I guess I did the 'easy thing'..the thing I knew I would get into at uni because I didn't really know what my dream was...come to think of it..I still don't!
    all the best to you following your dreams!

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  10. If everyone could follow their dreams everyone would do it, surely? I think there are lots of things that hold us back. I had a dream once. I wanted to be a photographer, but real life demands got in the way and I needed to actually earn money to survive. yes, fear and doubt also played a big part, but it wasn't the only thing that stopped me. Now I'm not even sure what my dream is. At the end of the day, I don't think what we do for a living has to be the dream, sometimes that is just what funds our other dreams. x

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  11. I think that you have to be in to win it - so keep putting yourself out there and something will come together for you.... I believe in life persistence really pays as long as you have the energy for it :-) so keep marching forward xox

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  12. I am all for being optimistic and following the craziest of dreams. I like the saying 'fake it until you make it' and have found this has lifted me many times. I will check him out - sounds really interesting.

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  13. I am all for being optimistic and following the craziest of dreams. I like the saying 'fake it until you make it' and have found this has lifted me many times. I will check him out - sounds really interesting.

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  14. This is a very interesting perspective. I think I have a hand in each bucket at the moment. A little bit from column A, a little from column B. It's a delicate balance.

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  15. I am waiting for the right time to be able to follow my dream of working from home...financially it is just not possible at the moment :)

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  16. I'm living my dream right now, well sort of, but not succeeding that well as still have such young children, and if I'm honest I dream about what I could be doing when they are all at school, but I should not wish the years away, they will soon be grown and I'll be all alone with my dreams and an empty house!

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  17. I am, usually, the optimist. I like to approach things with a positive mind.
    I always remember my mum saying she wanted to be an artist, and she is a good one, but her mum made her learn to be a secretary, she hated it. I guess that is why she was so unhappy being in the office when Dad and her had their own business. Now retired, she is diving into her painting and making her own garden art. She is finally doing what makes her happy.

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