Thursday, 15 September 2022

What's on my Bookshelf - September


Excitedly, I listened to the new Horowitz Hawthorne book, A Twist of a Knife. This series is delightful in the true sense of the word. It's funny, laugh out loud at times and so clever. I am very grateful there are more on the way. If you haven't read them, there are four now. All brilliantly entertaining, and easy reading crime to boot. They are also excellent on Audible. I have an absolute crush on the brain of this guy. This series is fabulous. I've already started harassing the excellent author on the next one, which he informs me is already underway....





I just finished this book by Dick Gregory. It is an interesting memoir, a real eye opener on the poverty in America and the mistreatment and complexity of segregation. By complexity I mean the way a rich or successful person could still be a star and admired/friends with white people but then not allowed in the venue for the team dinner etc. Not implying it was a complex issue that was somehow right in any way. He also at one point discusses the different racism in the North and the South, and that in the North it was there but disguised as something else. In the South you knew where you stood. Some really powerful words in there and well worth the read. It also comes up in this podcast which was how I found it. The book is in political from the inside view, as Dick Gregory was protesting with Meager Evers and down in Birmingham with the Civil Rights movement but it is also a life story of a poor boy who became one of the most beloved comedians in America. I will be tracking down his other books.




In the Gifts of Reading, this Muriel Spark book kept getting mentioned as books given as gifts by authors. So I gifted it to myself. Ha!. So far so good but not as funny as Symposium. Will discuss further when I finish it.







I read Little Weirds, which is at time exactly what the title says. At other times, really great poetic little anecdotes. I'm not sure if I recommend this or not. I think I do but maybe borrow from the library...








For book club we did Plum which is not something I would normally read but I am glad it was picked. I didn't love it, and I think it was actually two book ideas which would have worked better as different books. I did find the brain damage 'fog' point of view of the protagonist very interesting and well done. Again not sure I'd recommend but I did hear this interview and most of my book club seemed to really enjoy it.






Lastly, I finished John Banville's Snow, which is crime but a throw back to that sort of Darkness at Pemberly style and expertly written. There is a trigger warning (from me) on child abuse and I have to say it was done so masterfully it really made me feel disgusted (with that kind of physical revulsion that you feel creeping up your spine). I found it very disturbing and it sort of comes out of nowhere in terms of the rest of the style of the book. I am keen to read the Banville book I've had on my shelf for 30 years but never bothered to read so far...




So that's been my month's reading - what's on your bookshelf at the moment? (It should be what's on your bedside table, because there's plenty on my bookshelf that's been there for decades, still unread.)


Linking with #WhatsOnMyBookshelf #FriendshipFriday #WordsAndPictures and #WeekendCoffeeShare

bookworms monthly linky

loopyloulaura

My Random Musings

23 comments:

  1. I can't wait to read the new Horowitz and read A Far Cry From Kensington a year or so back. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie is on my list for my next Muriel outing... Thanks for linking up.

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    1. I read Brodie at school and really liked it. Recently on a whim I got Symposium, and it was so funny and silly and nothing like Brodie at all. Ian Rankin rote a PHD on her. I find her a curious author (in that my understanding of her seems at odds with her actual work and the global understanding of her...not sure if that's just the way Brodie was taught at school or I was just ignorant on her reputation..

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  2. Thank you for your weekend coffee share. Horowitz books sound like books that I'd enjoy reading.

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  3. Oh I didn't know about the new Horowitz book, will go looking for it now, as I love them too! Thanks for joining us.

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  4. Hi Lydia - quite an eclectic mix. I haven't come across any of them and it was good to read your honest reviews - especially about the ones that didn't really grab you.

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    1. I said that on two other peoples posts. I'm amazed at how we all have such broad reading patterns. Even if they aren['t books we'd read, usually you've heard of the author or seen marketing.

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  5. Hi Lydia,
    I've read some of AH's earlier youth books (our kids were his target audience) and yes, this guy writes great books.

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  6. I don't think I have ever read anything by Horowitz; but I am going to have to look into that series!

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    1. This is very different to his other stuff - it's very meta. He's a character. It's brilliant. I had a rough time in the second lockdown and my mood dipped and this series delighted me in the true sense of the word and really changed that period for me. It was quite incredible tbh.

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  7. Hi Lydia, love Anthony Horowitz so that book is definitely going on my TBR list. Thanks for sharing the books you've read this month and as always a great variety. See you next month at WOYBS.

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  8. I've only read one Horowitz. I need to give him another try. The Dick Gregory book has been on my reading list for awhile--need to get to it too.

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    1. It was such an eye opener for me. You probably already have a better base understanding of what went on. Quite unbelievable. Humans are the worst at times, and we just repeat it with new targets...

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  9. You have given me some great books to download on my Kindle #dreamteam

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  10. Hi, Lydia - Thank you for joining us for What's On Your Bookshelf. As others have already mentioned, I greatly appreciate your candid reviews - especially the ones where the books were not your favourite. Those reviews are usually much more difficult to write but are greatly appreciated.

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  11. Oh my gosh, just how many books have you read this month Lydia?! What a great achievement and loving all your recommendations. Thank you for sharing these over on the #DreamTeam x

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  12. I remember when black people in Australia could not vote, nor enter a hotel or place to swim. The Freedom Riders led by Charles Perkins set off for (I think) Moree to right the wrongs of the places to swim in late 1960s. I admit I was an adult (18) when a lot of this was happening around me and had no idea. I sure know much more now. So good to have you link up this week for Wednesday’s Words and Pics Link Up.

    Looking forward to connecting with you more again soon.

    It’s a weekly link up and I know it’s still new getting used to Wednesdays!

    I am grateful for your presence as a blogger and one who enjoys the connections we make.

    Warmest wishes,

    Denyse.

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    1. I'll admit it's really only the last decade that I've even started really thinking about it all - grappling with the intricacies, rather than just 'I'm against it' as a blanket idea. So it would not surprise me at all that most white 18 year olds back then didn't really 'see' what was going on. There wouldn't have been talks or tv shows or books about any of it.

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  13. This sounds like an interesting and diverse selection of books. I must say I've never read any of them or even heard of them. I do enjoy crime novels, but it sounds like Snow might be a bit too disturbing.
    Popping over from At Home a Lot.

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  14. A real mix of genres but I think the Horowitz book is the one I will look out for. Thanks for linking up with #DreamTeam

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  15. I just ordered a stack of books, but I wish I would have included: Starry Messenger by Neil degrasse Tyson. Next up: Wide Sargasso Sea.

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    1. We did the Rhys for book club. I liked it....(Tho I can't remember a thing about it now...)

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  16. You've sold me on Horowitz, I will have to add it to my TBR pile. I've not read any of your other books. Snow sounds a little disturbing.

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